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Tibetan Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism is the body of Buddhist religious doctrine and institutions characteristic of Tibet and certain regions of the Himalayas, including northern Nepal, Bhutan, and India. It is also practised in Mongolia and parts of Russia and Northeast China. Tibetan Buddhism comprises many distinct schools, but is primarily divided into four main traditions: Nyingma, Kagyu, Gelug, and Sakya. All schools are said to include the teachings of the three vehicles of Buddhism: the Foundational Vehicle, Mahayana and Vajrayana, although some schools, the Gelug for example, consider Vajrayana a part of Mahayana. The ideal goal of spiritual development in Tibetan Buddhism is to achieve enlightenment (Buddhahood) in order to most efficiently help all other sentient beings attain this state. Buddhahood is sometimes partially defined as a state of omniscience. It is said that there are countless beings who have attained Buddhahood. Buddhas spontaneously, naturally and continuously perform activities to benefit all sentient beings.
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